One of the most common topics of conversation is the weather. It's great for making small talk with others and is easy to discuss.

With help from the phrases below, you'll be able to start conversations all about the weather, as well as be able to describe and give your own opinions about it. Let's get started and expand your knowledge of English!

Asking What the Weather is Like

The weather can have a big affect on all of us. It could brighten up our day, or ruin a planned hike with a friend. So, it's helpful to know how to ask questions about it. We've collected the most useful ones for you below.
   
 
What's the weather like?
 
Is it snowing yet?
 
How windy is it out?
 
Is the sun shining?
 
What's the weather going to be like?
 
Is it going to storm?
 
How many degrees is it outside?
 
What's the temperature like?
 
How warm is it?
 
What did the forecast say this morning?
 
 
What's the weather like?
This is the most basic way to ask somebody to describe how the weather is. Another way to say this is How's the weather? You can make this question even more specific by adding words like today, later, or outside to the end of the question. For example, What's the weather like today?. Someone answering this question would then just describe the weather, for example like this: It's pretty chilly today.
What's the weather going to be like?
This question is very similar to What's the weather like? There is, however, one big difference. What's the weather like? is asking how the weather is right now, but What's the weather going to be like? is asking how the weather will be at some point in the future. Again, you can add other words to this question to be more specific. For example, What is the weather going to be like later today?. You could answer with something like, It's going to be sunny all day.
How many degrees is it outside?
Use this question or the question What's the temperature like? when you want to know what the exact temperature is. A response to this question might look like, It's 56 degrees out. In the English speaking world, there are two different systems of telling the temperature. Fahrenheit is used in the United States and its territories, while Celsius is used everywhere else.
What did the forecast say this morning?
This question along with What did the forecast say the weather is going to be like today? refer to weather reports or weather broadcasts, which are usually given either early in the morning or late at night on TV or the radio in America. You can usually find out what scientists predict the weather is going to be like by watching TV, listening to the radio or by using different apps on your phone. A typical response might look like: The forecast said it will rain this afternoon.

Describing the Weather

It's not enough to be able to just ask how the weather is, you also need to be able to describe it. There's lots of different ways to do this, and we've gathered some common examples for you in the table below.
   
 
It's cold outside.
 
It looks nice out.
 
It's raining right now.
 
It looks like it's going to rain.
 
The forecast said it will rain later.
 
The weather is beautiful.
 
It's 65 degrees out.
 
Be careful, it's slippery out!
 
It's so cloudy today.
 
It's a stormy day.
 
We're finally getting some snow.
 
It's absolutely shorts weather!
 
It's raining cats and dogs!
 
 
It's cold outside
There are a couple of different ways to describe the weather. You could use the sentence pattern It's + DESCRIPTION + outside. to give a simple description of the weather. For example, It's sunny out. A typical answer to this kind of sentence might describe the speaker's feelings towards the weather. A response to It's cold outside might be something like, Luckily, spring and warmer weather will be here soon.
It looks nice out
Another easy way to describe the weather is by using It looks + DESCRIPTION + out. It looks pretty stormy out is an example of this pattern. Again a typical response to a sentence like this might express the speaker's feelings towards the weather. For example, It's a perfect day to go for a walk could be a response to It looks nice out.
It's raining right now
A third way to describe the weather is to use It's + VERB + right now. A sentence like this will describe what the weather is doing. For example, It's snowing right now. You could respond to this kind of sentence in many ways. A response to It's raining right now might be something like this: We better not forget an umbrella.
It looks like it's going to rain
Use the construction, It looks like it's going to + VERB., to describe what you think the weather is going to be like at some point in the future. For example, It looks like it's going to snow this afternoon. Again, a response to this would probably show the speaker's feelings towards the weather, for example: I really hope it doesn't actually rain because I wanted to go to the park today.
The forecast said it will rain later
Another way to say this sentence is The forecast is calling for rain later. You could respond to sentences like these in many different ways. For example like this: Maybe the rain will clear up before the game this afternoon.
It's absolutely shorts weather!
You might hear this sentence as a description of summer weather. Sun shine, warm, and a cool breeze… That's the perfect weather to pull out your favorite pair of shorts and head outside to enjoy the sun! In response, you could say something like, Yeah, the weather is perfect today!.
It's raining cats and dogs!
No, don't worry, cats and dogs are not actually falling from the sky! This is an English idiom and is just another way to say that It's pouring out or that It's raining hard outside. Another way to say these things is to say that It's coming down in buckets. Just imagine somebody in the sky pouring buckets of water down from clouds, and you'll get a good idea of how much it's raining! A response to this might look something like, I've never seen so much rain before!.

Describing Feelings toward the Weather

We all have our favorite kind of weather. Maybe you like the cold? Do you prefer summer weather to winter weather? When we are discussing the weather, it's important that we are able to express our feelings towards it. Here are some examples of different ways to do this.
   
 
I hope that it won't rain.
 
I'm looking forward to when the sun comes out.
 
I'm loving this warm weather.
 
I can't wait for it to snow!
 
I'm freezing right now.
 
I'm too cold.
 
I don't like when it's too hot out.
 
I feel completely warm now.
 
I'm a cold weather kind of person.
 
 
I hope that it won't rain
Use the sentence pattern I hope that + WISH. to tell someone what you want the weather to be like. Some examples using this construction are, I hope that it doesn't snow today, I hope that it's sunny tomorrow or I hope that it stops raining. You can never be completely sure how the weather will be, so that's why we say: I hope. In response, you might agree or disagree, or even give your own opinion. For example, Me too, we've had enough rain this week.
I'm a cold weather kind of person
This phrase describes somebody that likes cold weather more than warm weather. You can switch the adjective (here cold) out for other adjectives and even nouns. For example, you could say: I'm a summer weather kind of person or I'm a rainy weather kind of person. To answer this kind of sentence, you'd give your own opinion. A response to I'm a cold weather kind of person might look something like this: I can't stand the cold!.

Answers to the Most Common Questions

What are the most important phrases that I need to talk about the weather in English?
  • What's the weather like?
  • What's the weather going to be like?
  • How many degrees is it outside?
  • It's 65 degrees out.
  • How warm is it?
  • It looks like it's going to rain.
  • I hope that it won't rain.

Show All Phrases
How do I ask how the weather is?
Do you want to know what the weather is like or going to be like later? You can use a number of questions to find this out! Questions like: What's the weather like?, How's the weather?, Is it raining yet?, What did the forecast say this morning? or What's the temperature like?.
How can I describe the weather?
There are several different ways to describe the weather in English:

It's + DESCRIPTION + outside.
  • It's cold outside.
  • It's hot outside.
  • It's warm outside.

It looks + DESCRIPTION + out.
  • It looks nice out.
  • It looks warm out.
  • It looks cold out.

It's + VERB + right now.
  • It's raining right now.
  • It's snowing right now.
  • It's hailing right now.
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